KTVL CBS Channel 10 Mailing List
 

News10 LiveLinks from BroadcastNews10 Good MorningWeather David Grubbs
KTVL CBS Channel 10 :: News - Top Stories - AP Study: Technology is killing jobs

Saturday, January 26 2013, 08:46 PM CST
AP Study: Technology is killing jobs
WASHINGTON (AP) -- They seem right out of a Hollywood fantasy, and they are: Cars that drive themselves have appeared in movies like "I, Robot" and the television show "Knight Rider."

Now, three years after Google invented one, automated cars could be on their way to a freeway near you. In the U.S., California and other states are rewriting the rules of the road to make way for driverless cars. Just one problem: What happens to the millions of people who make a living driving cars and trucks jobs that always have seemed sheltered from the onslaught of technology?

"All those jobs are going to disappear in the next 25 years," predicts Moshe Vardi, a computer scientist at Rice University in Houston. "Driving by people will look quaint; it will look like a horse and buggy."

If automation can unseat bus drivers, urban deliverymen, long-haul truckers, even cabbies, is any job safe?

Vardi poses an equally scary question: "Are we prepared for an economy in which 50 percent of people aren't working?"

An Associated Press analysis of employment data from 20 countries found that millions of midskill, midpay jobs already have disappeared over the past five years, and they are the jobs that form the backbone of the middle class in developed countries.

That experience has left a growing number of technologists and economists wondering what lies ahead. Will middle-class jobs return when the global economy recovers, or are they lost forever because of the advance of technology? The answer may not be known for years, perhaps decades. Experts argue among themselves whether the job market will recover, muddle along or get much worse.

To understand their arguments, it helps to understand the past.

Every time a transformative invention took hold over the past two centuries whether the steamboat in the 1820s or the locomotive in the 1850s or the telegraph or the telephone businesses would disappear and workers would lose jobs. But new businesses would emerge that employed even more.

The combustion engine decimated makers of horse-drawn carriages, saddles, buggy whips and other occupations that depended on the horse trade. But it also resulted in huge auto plants that employed hundreds of thousands of workers, who were paid enough to help create a prosperous middle class.

"What has always been true is that technology has destroyed jobs but also always created jobs," says Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz of Columbia University. "You know the old story we tell about (how) the car destroyed blacksmiths and created the auto industry."

The astounding capabilities of computer technology are forcing some mainstream economists to rethink the conventional wisdom about the economic benefits of technology, however. For the first time, we are seeing machines that can think or something close to it.

In the early 1980s, at the beginning of the personal computer age, economists thought computers would do what machines had done for two centuries eliminate jobs that required brawn, not brains. Low-level workers would be forced to seek training to qualify for jobs that required more skills. They'd become more productive and earn more money. The process would be the same as when mechanization replaced manual labor on the farm a century ago; workers moved to the city and got factory jobs that required higher skills but paid more.

But it hasn't quite worked out that way. It turns out that computers most easily target jobs that involve routines, whatever skill level they require. And the most vulnerable of these jobs, economists have found, tend to employ midskill workers, even those held by people with college degrees the very jobs that support a middle-class, consumer economy.

So the rise of computer technology poses a threat that previous generations of machines didn't: The old machines replaced human brawn but created jobs that required human brains. The new machines threaten both.

"Technological change is more encompassing and moving faster and making it harder and harder to find things that people have a comparative advantage in" versus machines, says David Autor, an economist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who has studied the loss of midpay jobs to technology.

Here are the three scenarios that economists and technologists offer about jobs in the future:

THE ECONOMY RETURNS TO HEALTH AFTER A WRENCHING TRANSITION

It has always happened before. Europe and the United States endured repeated economic and social upheaval during the 19th and early 20th centuries as their agricultural economies transformed into industrial ones. Columbia's Stiglitz argues that such pressures led to the collapse of the world economy in 1929 the cataclysm we call the Great Depression.

The mechanization of farming caused agricultural production to soar worldwide in the 1920s and prices to plunge. In the U.S., crop and livestock prices fell by 50 percent between 1929 and 1932. American farmers, who accounted for a fifth of the U.S. workforce, lost purchasing power and also struggled to pay their mortgages and other loans. As their debts went bad, banks began to collapse, squeezing credit and spreading panic. The economy went into free-fall.

Only World War II and the massive rearmament program it required restored the U.S. economy to full health. The experience was traumatizing. And today only 2 percent of Americans work on farms.

"Economies don't make these transitions well," Stiglitz says. People in the dying parts of the economy can't afford to invest in the education or retraining they need to find different work. "So you get workers trapped in the wrong sectors or unemployed," he says.

Peter Lindert, an economist at the University of California-Davis, says computers are more disruptive than earlier innovations because they are "general-purpose technologies" used by all kinds of companies. They upend many industries instead of just a few. The mechanized looms the Luddites hated in England in the early 1800s, for instance, rattled one industry. Information technology touches every business.

The changes are coming much faster this time, too. Lindert says that's showing up in the steep drop in prices for some products this time.

In the Industrial Revolution, "the price of textiles went down. But it was a small number compared to how the cost of information storage has gone down. It's a fraction of what it was in the 1970s," Lindert says. Now, computing power is doubling every 18 months to two years and the price is plummeting.

But Lindert does not believe workers are doomed to unemployment. With the right skills and education, he says, they can learn to work with the machines and become productive enough to fend off the automation threat.

"There is a period of time that is extremely disruptive," says Thomas Schneider, CEO of the consultancy Restructuring Associates. "If you're 55 years old now and lose your job, the odds of you ever getting hired into what you were doing before is as close to zero as you can imagine. If you are a 12-year-old, you have a very bright future. It's just not doing what your father was doing or your mother was doing."

The rise of the iPhone, for instance, has put more than 290,000 people to work on related iPhone apps since 2007, according to Apple. That suggests that new technology continues to create new types of jobs that require higher skills and creativity.

"Over the long run, I have confidence we can do it," Stiglitz says. But, he warns, "I can see us being in this kind of doldrums for half a decade, for a decade, or for longer."

THE ECONOMY CONTINUES TO PRODUCE JOBS, JUST NOT ENOUGH GOOD ONES

Some economists worry that the sluggish, lopsided labor market of the past five years is what we'll be stuck with in the future.

Smarter machines and niftier software will continue to replace more and more midpay jobs, making businesses more productive and swelling their profits.

The most highly skilled workers those who can use machines to be more productive but can't be replaced by them will continue to prosper. Many low-pay jobs are likely to remain sheltered from the technological offensive: Robots are too clumsy to tidy up hotel rooms or clear dirty dishes at busy restaurants.

"Computers can do calculus better than any human being," says Andrew McAfee, principal research scientist at MIT's Center for Digital Business. But "restaurant bus boy is a very safe job for a long time to come."

Under this scenario, technology could continue to push economic growth but only a few would enjoy the benefits. More people would be competing for midpay jobs, so pay would shrivel. Many midskill workers would be left unemployed or shunted into low-skill, low-pay jobs. The income gap between the rich and ordinary citizens, already at record levels in many developed countries, would continue to widen.

Most economists say that unequal societies don't prosper; it takes a large and confident middle class to produce the consumer spending that drives healthy economic growth. "In the long run, you could actually see growth stopping," says economist Maarten Goos at Belgium's University of Leuven. "If everyone is employed in low-wage service jobs, then, that's it."

TECHNOLOGY LEADS TO MASS UNEMPLOYMENT

In a speech last year, former U.S. Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers declared that the biggest economic issue of the future would not be the federal debt or competition from China but "the dramatic transformations that technology is bringing about."

Summers imagined a machine called the "Doer" that could make anything or provide any service. Productivity would soar. Wonderful goods and services would emerge. Enormous wealth would go "to those who could design better Doers, to those who could think of better things for Doers to do." But everyone else would be worthless in the labor market.

Summers said the world is moving in that direction and has completed only 15 percent of the journey, but already we are "observing its consequences."

Consequences, indeed. ATMs dislodged bank tellers. Microsoft Outlook manages what secretaries used to do. Expedia is replacing travel agents. E-ZPass is doing away with toll-booth operators. And robots continue to supplant factory workers.

But surely some jobs are safe. Truck drivers, perhaps? A machine can't negotiate a left-hand turn against oncoming traffic without a human behind the wheel, can it? Or so economists Frank Levy of MIT and Richard Murnane of Harvard University reasoned in their book "The New Division of Labor," way back in 2004.

That was then.

Six years later, Google developed a car that could drive itself, crossing the Golden Gate Bridge, circling Lake Tahoe and cruising down Hollywood Boulevard. The gee-whiz driverless car could soon claim victims in the job market.

"Twice a week, a truck comes near my house, and two guys get out and pick up the garbage," says Vardi, the Rice computer scientist. "This will disappear. There will still be a truck coming, but it will be driven autonomously, and the garbage will be picked up autonomously, and those jobs will be gone."

In the United States alone, 92,000 people are employed as sanitation workers, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Add all other driving occupations, from long-haul truckers to taxi cab drivers, and the total exceeds 4 million. All those jobs may be in danger.

And that's the future: Other occupations already are disappearing. Add up the jobs that technology can take across dozens of occupations and the result, Vardi and others warn, is unemployment on a scale we haven't begun to imagine.

"The vast majority of people do routine work. The human economy has always demanded routine work," says software entrepreneur Martin Ford. He worries that machines will take all those routine jobs, leaving few opportunities for ordinary workers.

In his book "The Lights in the Tunnel," Ford foresees a computer-dominated economy with 75 percent unemployment before the end of this century; the vast majority of workers, he predicts, won't be able to develop the skills necessary to outrun job-killing computers and robots.

"People talk about the future, creating new industries and new businesses," Ford says. "But there's every indication that these are not going to be in labor-intensive industries. ... Right from the get-go, they're going to be digital."

Consider the great business successes of the Internet age: Apple employs 80,000 people worldwide; Google, 54,000; Facebook, 4,300. Combined, those three superstar companies employ less than a quarter of the 600,000 people General Motors had in the 1970s. And today, GM employs just 202,000 people, while making more cars than ever.

As far back as 1958, American union leader Walter Reuther recalled going through a Ford Motor plant that was already automated. A company manager goaded him: "Aren't you worried about how you are going to collect union dues from all these machines?"

"The thought that occurred to me," Reuther replied, "was how are you going to sell cars to these machines?"
AP Study: Technology is killing jobs

[an error occurred while processing this directive]

Related Stories

  • KTVL :: Community - Providence Healthy Avenues

    Providence Healthy Avenues

    Providence gives you the inside scoop on how to make your life healthier and easier one week and one minute at a time.
  • KTVL :: Community - Ray's Stuff The Truck

    Ray's Stuff The Truck

    Join us in the fight against hunger!
  • KTVL :: Community - LIVE with News10 Good Morning

    LIVE with News10 Good Morning

    Every morning the News10 Good Morning takes you LIVE to the events affecting YOUR community. Miss the morning broadcast? News10 has you covered -- all of the videos are available here.
  • KTVL :: Community - Health and Beauty

    Health and Beauty



  • KTVL :: Community - Automotive

    Automotive

    Find valuable information about buying your next car, including price quotes and your latest automotive news.
  • KTVL :: Community - We Know Why You're Awake

    We Know Why You're Awake

    We Know Why You're Awake. We can help.
  • KTVL :: Community - Closings & Delays

    Closings & Delays

    Check here for closures and delays.
  • KTVL :: Community - Community Calendar

    Community Calendar

    Looking for something to do? Check the events calendar.
  • KTVL :: Community - Gas Prices

    Gas Prices

    Gas prices are on everybody's mind. So News10 is working with Gas Buddy to help you find the cheapest gas in the area.

  • Chideo College Sweeps

    Enter for a chance to win a trip to the first ever College Football National Championship at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas. If you're a football fan, you won't want to miss this historic event!
  • 2014 Gridiron Football Bracket Contest

    Enter the 2014 Gridiron Football Bracket Contest!
  • No Text Zone

    Help make our roads safe and you could win prizes! 

Should your town impose a 1-year moratorium on medical marijuana dispensaries?
ASHLAND, Ore. (AP) — One of Oregon's more liberal cities is considering a moratorium on medical marijuana dispensaries.

The Ashland Daily Tidings newspaper reports that the Oregon Health Authority Medical Marijuana Dispensary Program has already received six dispensary applications for Ashland.

But neighborhood opposition has been increasing and the council will discuss a moratorium on April 1.

People hoping to launch dispensaries in Oregon began submitting applications to the state on March 3 as part of a new medical marijuana regulatory system.

A proposed dispensary called Top Shelf Meds abuts an Ashland neighborhood.

Carol Kim says the dispensary is separated from her home by a hedge. She says it's ironic that state rules bar dispensaries near schools, but her daughters will come home from school and have to live near a dispensary.
___

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press.
YES
My town should definitely impose the moratorium for one year -- no more, no less.
NO
My town should NOT impose the moratorium for any length of time. My town should follow current state laws on medical marijuana dispensaries.
Undecided
I am unsure whether I am in favor of medical marijuana dispensaries in my town, regardless of current state laws.


KTVL Top Stories

Winter weather packs a punch

Crime spree suspect behind bars

GMO vote recount expected

News10 Crime Update

News10 News Break Nov. 22

SOU student: President's immigration announcement is weight off my shoulders

Illegal turtles enter Oregon via internet sales, street vendors, pet trade

Grants Pass police arrest suspect in hit-run

Monitored person in Jackson County clear of Ebola virus

Woman jogger abducted in Central Point

Immigration policy changes affect your town

Lark's Perfect Pie Crust

Lark's Pumpkin Cranberry Twists

Chimney Fires Keeping Firefighters Busy

Another One Rides the Bus

Woman hit by car dies

News10 News Break Nov. 18

Beekeepers fight to hold Jackson County to honeybee laws

Crab season is here!

Custody case: Oregon man surrenders; daughter safe

Suspect killed after shooting at FSU

3 people shot in overnight shooting at Florida State University

President to pitch immigration reform

Ink Out: changing lives one treatment at a time

11.19.14: This Week in Your Sports

Remembering Grubbs Three Years After the Murder

To his credit

Police and city leaders knock on doors

Christmas comes early for Weed Elementary students

Portland school reacting to student sex videos

Grants Pass woman sentenced to 15 years in prison

First 19 beams on bridge going up at Fern Valley Interchange

Southern Oregon University Not Allowing Marijuana on its Campus

Shooting suspect on the run from Grants Pass Police

Voices of 9-1-1: Providing help when it matters most

If you don't know, now you know: Nov. 18

Live-saving drug hitting the streets in Medford

DMV opens temp outlets to meet immigrant demand

Stuff the truck: stop hunger

Marijuana still banned at University of Oregon

Seattle City Council wants to fund internet in homeless camps

City to vote on climate change labels at gas pumps

Reports of Portland high school students recording sex acts

Klamath Falls Authorities Need Help in Finding Tyler Nelson's Killers

Men arrested after firing guns at target practice

Denny's a grand slam in Medford

Ice Rink Opens in Ashland

The Voices of 9-1-1

Suspected robber killed

Cuddle shop booming in Portland

Roughly 700 votes contested

UPDATE: 2 additional suspects arrested in robbery resulting in fatal shooting

Hundreds attend benefit for McGhee's victim

SOU takes stand against domestic violence

Bill Cosby's guest shot with Letterman canceled

Man shot in Grants Pass, suspects unknown

Search for shooter continues

Airport hopes commercial flights return

"I am a fire survivor"

Ice rink waits for cover

Homegrown Hype: The Great Metal Works of Cheryl D Garcia

SPD officer protects crowd from pair of "erotically entwined" eagles

Not guilty plea in California desert graves case

Utah trucker is accused of keeping more sex slaves

Drug bust ends with 6 arrests

Wade Phillips charged with 3 counts of attempted murder

Wrong-Way driver dies in crash on I-5

Open enrollment begins, Oregonians must re-enroll

Man killed in Klamath Falls shooting

Domestic violence crime patterns continue

Job opening up at Mt. Ashland ski area

Scamming The System: Investigating Fraud

'The Material Girls' Deliver 120 Quilts to Medford Hospitals

Monsanto to Pay $2.4 Million in GMO Dispute Settlement

Domestic violence aftermath on the children

ODOT prepares for winter woes

Bank robbery suspect found working recycling crew

Facebook again tries to simplify privacy policy

Study finds as world warms, US gets more lightning

Two suspects arrested in drug investigation

BP's Olympic Pipeline repaired at Burlington

Mt. Ashland holding job fair Thursday

Controversy over Crystal Geyser in local town

Hempstalk Festival denied 2015 permit

Oregon, Washington scavenger hunt for AEDs

Oregon's homeless student population is up

This Week In Your Sports

Scamming the System: Lies lead to abuse of government programs

FBI: Bank robber called 'Roscoe Bandit' captured

New Oregon Recycling Center Will Replace Current Retail Centers in Medford

Shooting victim neighbor speaks out

Remote Nevada quakes result from stretching crust

GM: Parts ready to fix SUVs that can catch fire

Supreme Court weighs state tax authority

Man charged in death of Central Point woman

Oregon gas prices reach 4-year low

One injured in Medford house fire

Breeze Botanicals "Celebrate" Veterans Day Every Day

V.A. Facility in White City Adds 'Town Hall' Forums and Honors Veterans in Celebration

Domestic violence scars children

Southern Oregon SNAP fraud numbers

Tuesday Talk: Washington city considering dropping bodycams for officers

Missing Oregon man is safe in Texas

Manhunt for Central Point homicide suspect ends

Veterans Day events

Crews start Kim's Restaurant demolition

Football team wins second straight championship

E-cigarettes eye marijuana industry

Ashland students getting hands-on ecology lesson

Hundreds attend vigil for boy dropped from bridge

Kidnapped Idaho man found dead in Oregon

Man dies in crash near Grants Pass

Game on for local butcher shop

GPDPS releases updated photos of suspect in crash

Veteran killed after celebrating return from duty

American freed by North Korea wanted pizza

Second structure fire victim is released from hospital

Firefighters get ready for winter

ORCycle mobile app hits phones Monday

Kim's restaurant to be demolished

Man arrested for choking his fiancee in motel room

Man pleads guilty to Red Rock murder

Construction of Yreka casino could start in spring

Oregon woman claims pedicure led to leg amputation

Police already deal with marijuana

Police seek Latino trust

8th annual Ashland culinary festival

USDA approves GMO potato designed by Simplot

Tracking devices in cars

Suspect in court in slaying of California family

Homegrown Hype: Patchy Sanders takes it off

Hunter from Salem missing in Douglas County

US traveler detained for 2 months in East Timor

Man pleads guilty in stabbing at Grants Pass bar

State leaders prepare for legal marijuana

Police: Burglars keep close eye on victims

West Coast Flavors: Sweet Potato Cheesecake

New Parking Lot for Medford City Employees

Medford City Council Continue to Discuss City's Electronic Signs

Medford's Dangerous Dog Ordinance Nearing Decision

Magnitudes increase in earthquake swarm

Feeding the homeless: Act of charity or a crime?

Man sought in Wash. killing arrested in Oregon

S. Ore. police hunt man in attempted abduction

Despite losses, GMO label backers aren't quitting

Uncle: Mom of boy found dead got psychiatric care

Man in online murder photo case waives extradition

Craft brewer vows business as usual after sale

Police searching for suspect after chase, crash in Grants Pass

Memorial vigil for boy dropped off Newport bridge

State leaders get down to business on details for Measure 91

RVTD: Funding measure failed, job cuts likely

To label or not to label? Vote is split on Measure 92

Rogue River man released from jail, commits another crime days after

Medford Police Crime Update: Monday, Nov. 3

FBI: Kidnapping suspect appears in LA court

Man sought in 6 bank robberies found in Oklahoma

OC teen poll worker removed for offensive tweets

Measure 91 passing in preliminary tallies

Josephine County Results

Oregon State Wide Measures

Jackson County Results

California Election Results

Food Network's Restaurant Impossible Lands in Ashland to Begin Work on Mystic Treats

Man arrested for attempted murder in Ashland

Vatican official condems assisted suicide

Woman accused of throwing son off Oregon bridge

Group says GMO soy found in baby formula

Neighbor gets a front row seat to a plane crash

Local law enforcement work together over the holiday weekend

Roof over Ashland ice rink still in question

Person monitored for Ebola in Jackson County

A look at use of Oregon's law on assisted suicide

Man missing from adult foster home found

10-year-old boy hit by car in Gresham dies

Man arrested in Oregon following Idaho shooting

Terminally ill 'death with dignity' advocate dies

Woman in Oregon hospital does not have Ebola

Ex-Beaverton officer found guilty of raping girl

Oregon's transition to federal exchange on track

Obama says wealthy don't need another champion

Mexico: DNA tests confirm 3 dead were US citizens

Marine veteran out of Mexico jail, home in Florida

Scientists try to predict number of US Ebola cases

Report says 60,000 veterans get triple benefits

Teen accused of killing Wash. girl, 6, enters plea

Sheriff looking for missing man with dementia

No injuries in Applegate Valley plane crash

Free cat adoption

Darkwing Manor shuts down early

Advocates of Measure 88 say driver cards ensure safety

Mexican judge orders release of jailed marine

Woman in Oregon hospitalized with fever

S. Oregon: woman fatally shot by dad while hunting

Person under monitoring for Ebola hospitalized

Teen missing near O'Brien found

Breaking Down The Ballot: Measure 86

A Deeper Look Into Measure 90

West Coast Flavors: Sweet Potato Gnocchi

A High State of Mind: Measure 91 may boost local economy

Court says Oregon woman to remain on death row

Richardson accuses Kitzhaber of hiding from press

Police to increase patrol on Halloween

Police: Man wanted in trooper ambush is captured

Wandering wolf: not yet ready for new collar

Man arrested for robbery in Medford drug deal

Last day to mail election ballots in Oregon

More people looking for work in Oregon

A High State of Mind: Counties and cities fight for a piece of the pie

Josephine County Sheriff's Race: Gil Gilbertson

Southern Oregon Sports Oct. 29

MPD Issues Statment on Halloween Safety

Pair delivers twins on way to hospital

News10 News Break Oct. 29

Public transportation nears reality

State senator race underway for third district

Josephine County Sheriff's Race: Dave Daniel

Local couple sheds light on dealing with cancer

Postal worker takes action to put crooks behind bars

Students suspended for airsoft photo

Lawsuit alleges school used student as "rape bait"

Video aims to end street harassment

Police chase naked suspect, capture him in pants

Human remains found in Klamath County identified as missing man

Local postal worker recognized for quick thinking

Police: Child rape suspect vowed to kill victim

Ford recalls 205,000 SUVs for fuel tank leaks

Grants Pass man allegedly attacks federal marshall

Child rape suspect caught in NY after month on run

A High State of Mind: Law enforcement and the OLCC discuss regulatory changes if Measure 91 passes

Measure 92 a hot ballot measure

Medford's Most Wanted Oct. 27

Crimestoppers: Central Point wallet theft

Man fights $70k in child support, says child isn't his

Man fired for taking photo of breastfeeding mom

Mushroom hunter finds skeletal remains

Jim Parsons Takes Over Iconic Role

NASA: Unmanned rocket exploded after liftoff

Oregon again testing per-mile road taxes

Super PAC backs Robinson's run against DeFazio

Lauren Hill starts layup challenge for cancer

Voting machines taken out of commission in Illinois, Maryland

Child hit by car at Grants Pass bus stop

Curry County to seek help with storm damages

Halloween Festivities Halted Temporarliy

A High State of Mind: Supporters and critics of Measure 91 speak their minds

Sheriff Winters staff publicly announce allegations

News10 News Break Oct. 27

Medford Police looking for theft suspect

Matthew Hyrup sentenced

Alleged Medford arsonist and Klamath Falls shooter sentenced

Evenflo recalls infant seats to fix sticky buckles

Medical examiner names 2 Marysville school deaths

Election Day just over a week away

JCSEA responds to Winters' statement about recent criticism

RECALL ALERT: Baby Wipes Recalled Due To Bacterial Contamination

Police: Massachusetts suspect may be headed east

Man killed on Bear Creek Greenway

Medford police investigate shooting

Grants Pass fire caused by electrical problems

Fire destroys historic, vacant hotel in Madras

Rescuers reach disabled sailboat in Pacific

Change in weather does good things for businesses

Pennies for radio

Man and pets found dead in structure fire

Halloween spirit takes over Medford

Assistance dog scam concerns

2-alarm house fire burning in Klamath County

[an error occurred while processing this directive]

Newsmax Headlines

Sponsored content

Business News

China unexpectedly cuts rates to support economy

BEIJING (AP) -- China's central bank unexpectedly slashed interest rates on Friday to re-energize the world's No. 2 economy, joining a growing list of major economies that are trying to encourage growth in the face of a global slowdown.

Consumer Info

   WEST PALM BEACH, FL -- (Marketwired) -- 03/21/14 --
 Companies that pride themselves on being eco-friendly may have conflicted
 ideas between marketing with ad specialties and maintaining their green
 reputation. ...

Entertainment News

BILL COSBY - FLORIDA WOMAN MAKES ACCUSATION

BOCA RATON, Fla. (AP) -- A Florida woman has become the fourth in recent weeks to make a rape allegation against Bill Cosby.

Get This

WEIRD WEATHER

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) -- With much of the nation digging out from snowstorms -- you might figure Anchorage, Alaska, must be buried.

Science/Tech News

IN THE NEWS: ASSESSING CYBER THREAT

WASHINGTON (AP) -- It's something people suspect could happen.


 
  • KTVL :: News - Across The Nation

    Across The Nation

    News and information from across the nation.
  • KTVL :: News - The Ferguson Decision

    The Ferguson Decision

    Get the latest developments in the Ferguson Decision here!
  • KTVL :: News - Tracking Ebola

    Tracking Ebola



  • KTVL :: News - Border Crisis

    Border Crisis



  • KTVL :: News - Elections Day

    Elections Day

    Elections are in full swing in your town.Stick with News10 as the ballots continue to be submitted!
  • KTVL :: News - The Great Outdoors

    The Great Outdoors

    Join KTVL News10 for The Great Outdoors, a weekly segment featuring numerous activities related to outdoor living in Southern Oregon and Northern California.
  • KTVL :: News - Medford Teachers Strike

    Medford Teachers Strike

    As of 7 p.m. Wednesday February 5, 2014, no compromise in the dispute over a new contract between the Medford School District and Medford Education Association. 
  • KTVL :: News - Rogue River Homicide

    Rogue River Homicide

    The Jackson County Sheriff's office says 65-year-old Susan Monica was arrested for identity theft and other theft charges last Friday...
  • KTVL :: News - Patricia MacCallum Murder Trial

    Patricia MacCallum Murder Trial

    Patricia MacCallum is accused of shooting and killing her husband, Christopher MacCallum, during a camping trip last year. Patricia MacCallum's trial began Nov. 18. News10 is at the courthouse and will ...
  • KTVL :: News - Health Matters

    Health Matters

    Local Health Care Professionals Providing You With Helpful Health Tips!
  • KTVL :: News - Fire Watch 2013

    Fire Watch 2013

    Your source for evacuations, closures and relief efforts.
  • KTVL :: News - Your Voice. Your Future.

    Your Voice. Your Future.

    As the country faces challenges from federal budget issues to jobs and national debt, your voice is critical to the future.
  • KTVL :: News - Medfords Most Wanted

    Medfords Most Wanted

    Each week, News10 looks at the Rogue Valley's most wanted criminals and finds out who has been caught.
  • KTVL :: News - Health Care Reform

    Health Care Reform

     The Supreme Court ruling to uphold the Affordable Care Act sparked a new battle. Check here daily for the latest developments, locally and across the country.
  • KTVL :: News - Biscuit Fire:Ten Years Later

    Biscuit Fire:Ten Years Later

    It has been ten years since the Biscuit Fire scorched 500,00 acres in the Siskiyou National Forest.

  • KTVL :: News - Tasty Topics

    Tasty Topics

    We've all seen News10's Trish Glose tasting food on West Coast Flavors. Now she has more space to talk about food and drink!
  • KTVL :: News - No Text Zone

    No Text Zone

    Texting While Driving Kills Thousands of People Each Year. Many More are Seriously Injured. You Can Help Make Our Roads a NO TEXT ZONE
  • KTVL :: News - Washington Times

    Washington Times

    Politics, Breaking News, US and World News.
  • KTVL :: News - Reality Check

    Reality Check

    How are your tax dollars being spent? Reality Check tracks whether local, state and federal governments or any groups are using your money wisely...or wasting it.
  • KTVL :: News - Your View

    Your View

    When you see news, share it with us. Your View is the perfect place to share the video and photos you capture your town.
  • KTVL :: News - Green Wednesday

    Green Wednesday

    There are limits to our natural resources and News 10's Green Wednesday provides information on how we can be better stewards of the environment.

  • KTVL :: News - Cool Schools

    Cool Schools

    News10 is visiting Medford elementary schools and letting them show us what makes their school great.
  • KTVL :: News - On The Town

    On The Town

    On the Town highlights local entertainment activities from concerts at the Craterian, to plays, parades and fun runs, for the week and weekends in Medford and counties in Southern Oregon.
  • KTVL :: News - To Your Health

    To Your Health

    Dr. Dan, Monday KTVL News10 at 5 answers your health questions and discusses the latest developments in medecine. If you have questions, find the e-mail address and mailing address at ktvl.com.
  • KTVL :: News - West Coast Flavors

    West Coast Flavors

    Who doesn't love good food? News 10 invites area chefs to the West Coast Appliance kitchen to cook up their favorite recipes.

  • KTVL :: News - Crime Stoppers

    Crime Stoppers

    Crime Stoppers, Medford, Southern Oregon's answer to crime at ktvl.com. Find a police report of the active case, descriptons of suspects, vehicle information, rewards.

  • KTVL :: News - Rogue Gangs

    Rogue Gangs

    Gangs are a growing concern for police in Southern Oregon and Northern California. News 10 is taking an in-depth look at the issue.
  • KTVL :: News - Links from Our Broadcast

    Links from Our Broadcast

    Links and numbers from our newscasts at KTVL News10, Medford, Southern Oregon's news source. Relevant links to research topics of interest or to contact organizations.

  • KTVL :: News - Consumer Links

    Consumer Links

    Consumer information, links and numbers. Useful links to protect and educate the consumer from the Oregon and California State Departments, the federal government and other Associations.
  • KTVL :: News - Safety Links

    Safety Links

    Safety - links and numbers at ktvl.com. Emergency preparedness plans for Curry, Jackson, and Josephine counties' citizens. Links to California and Oregon Emergency Management Offices, National Safety Council, ...
  • KTVL :: News - Voting Links

    Voting Links

    Links to websites full of information and background material, as well as sites that help you take action.
  • KTVL :: News - Local Links

    Local Links

    Local links for Medford, Southern Oregon and Northern California. Community links for Curry, Josephine, Jackson, Klamath, Lake and Siskiyou Counties, schools, cities, chambers of commerce, Rogue Valley ...

more »

Tonight on KTVL

9:00am:    NFL Today presented by Southwest Airlines
10:00am:  NFL Football: Cincinnati @ Houston
  1:25pm:  NFL Football: Washington @ San Francisco
  4:30pm:  (various)
  5:00pm:  The Good Wife (R)
  6:00pm:  News10 at 6pm
  6:30pm:  CBS Evening News
  7:00pm:  60 Minutes
  8:00pm:  Madam Secretary
  9:00pm:  The Good Wife
10:00pm:  CSI
11:00pm:  News10 at 11pm
11:30pm:  Blue Bloods (R)
12:30am:  Extra Weekend

Complete Schedule »